Clara Ledesma


Clara Ledesma was born in Santiago, Dominican Republic in 1924 and died in New York in 1999. She received her first art lessons from Yoryi Morel, considered to be one of the founders of the modernist school of Dominican painting, along with Jaime Colson and DarĂ­o Suro.

Ledesma was one of the first women to join the National School of Fine Arts, graduating in 1948. She then became a professor, and later became Deputy Director in the 1950s, with Jaime Colson, Joseph Gausachs and Gilberto Hernandez Ortega, 'The Group of Four.'

She studied painting at prestigious academies abroad and then return to the country where she presented works that she had conducted in Europe under the influence of Miro, Chagall and Paul Klee, among others.



The schematic symbols in Ledesma's paintings magically and academic reflects a spectacular fantasy from reality. Renowned for brilliant effects of light and pleasant colors. Her figures show no hallucinations and maintain harmony with the mystery of being. Depicting a fantasy of reality based on effects of light, color and imaginative power of their magic, naive and charming figures. She tried to represent native paintings, with concern, but away from the drama. One of her best stage was marked by the issue of blackness.

Luis E. Lama, in an article published in the newspaper 'EI Caribe' in 1978, defines the art of Clara Ledesma as follows:

In her paintings formal elements persist, whose repetition confers a character which is definitely emblematic, such as circles and crescents, floating beings, the inhabitants of this world staff, mystical and vital at a time, where the symbolism, primary and elementary, in most cases leads us to the procreation and fertilization by a chaste sexual code that is closely related to archetypal imagery. Clara Ledesma assumes through the signs and colors which is supposed to be an image of the tropics and on that basis seeks beauty with flowers, mermaids and sailboats recreating a strange personal mythology where traditions nor excesses are absent...


Source: Museo Bellapart, Santo Domingo.